Friends of Grain Elevators

South End Elevators

2 Electric (Purves) cropped from Onch original

Searle B

Overview

Original Name:
Date of opening:
Designer:
Builder:
Initial Owner:
Current Owner:

Mutual Elevator
1916
Fegles Engineering
Fegles Engineering
Mutual Elevator Company Ltd.
--

Capacity:
Piles:
Initial Railway Service:
Geographic Service:
Operating:

1,000,000 bushels or 27,200 tonnes
--
Canadian Northern
48.350498, -89.3044743
No, demolished

Black and Muirhead hhm

Black and Muirhead

Overview

Original Name:
Date of opening:
Designer:
Builder:
Initial Owner:
Current Owner:

Black and Muirhead
1909
Barnett-McQueen (additions)
Barnett-McQueen (additions)
Black and Muirhead Company
--

Capacity:
Piles:
Initial Railway Service:
Geographic Service
Operating:

200,000 bushels or 5,440 tonnes
--
Canadian Northern
48.351674, -89.304807
No, demolished

Cropped Northwestern 3 Northwestern (Federal)

Federal

Overview

Original Name:
Date of opening:
Designer:
Builder:
Initial Owner:
Current Owner:

Northwestern
1917
F.R. McQueen
--
Northwestern Elevator Company
--

Capacity:
Piles:
Initial Railway Service:
Geographic Service:
Operating:

3,000,000 bushels - 81,600 tonnes
--
--
48.353874, -89.304711
No, demolished

Cropped 9 Paterson elevator

Paterson

Overview

Original Name:
Date of opening:
Designer:
Builder:
Initial Owner:
Current Owner:

Paterson
1914
Feagles Engineering
Barnett-McQueen
N.M. Paterson & Sons
--

Capacity:
Piles:
Initial Railway Service:
Geographic Service:
Operating:

4,000,000 bushels - 108,800 tonnes
--
Canadian Pacific
48.360022, -89.286214
No, demolished

Western Terminal hhm

Saskatchewan Wheat Pool 5

Overview

Original Name:
Date of opening:
Designer:
Builder:
Initial Owner:
Current Owner:

Western Terminal
1909
Barnett-McQueen
Barnett-McQueen, Fegles Engineering (expansion)
Western Terminal Elevator Company
--

Capacity:
Piles:
Initial Railway Service:
Geographic Service:
Operating:

3,100,000 bushels - 84,300 tonnes
--
Canadian Pacific
48.362015, -89.278282
No, demolished

Western Grain By-Products Storage

The Fort William Elevator, last known as Western Grain By-products, is a gem of an elevator on the north bank of the Kaministiquia River, which empties into Lake Superior. The site includes railway, storage & handling, and water shipping components. The elevator, which received its first shipment in 1913, was a state of the art terminal that incorporated cutting edge construction techniques. The FWE Company ran a full-page ad proudly outlining the terminal’s innovative features.

With a capacity of 1,750,000 bushels, Western Grain has successfully transferred millions of tonnes to receiving ports around the world.

Overview

Original Name:
Date of opening:
Designer:
Builder:
Initial Owner:
Current Owner:

Fort William Elevator
1913
Barnett-McQueen
Barnett-McQueen
Fort William Elevator Company
To be announced

Capacity:
Piles:
Initial Railway Service:
Geographic Service:
Operating:

1,750,000 bushels - 48 concrete bins
2,500 locally sourced jack pine piles
Canadian Pacific
48.351802399999999, -89.282596300000002
No, decommissioned

Saskatchewan Wheat Pool 11

The Consolidated elevator was constructed in two phases, giving the terminal is distinctive “double elevator” look. The first side was constructed in 1907 by Barnett-McQueen. The annex bins were tile construction, and the workhouse was tile, brick, and reinforced concrete. The 85-foot-high bins were arranged 4x8 and had gently sloped bottoms. The tile and brick workhouse was 157 feet high. The second workhouse and annex were constructed in 1910 by James Stewart and Company. Both annex and workhouse on the second elevator were entirely reinforced concrete. The concrete workhouse was taller at 167 feet, and the concrete bins were arranged 3x8 with steeply sloped bottoms, also 85 feet high. Enclosed galleries connected both workhouses and annexes. The now 1,750,000-bushel capacity elevator had 2 receiving tracks which held 35 cars each. At the time, the elevator was considered on of the most efficient rapid handling elevators in the Lakehead—though the company boasted it was one of the fastest in the world. 

Consolidated Elevator Company eventually sold their terminal to the Fort William Elevator Company, changing the name to Fort William Elevator E. In 1971 Saskatchewan Wheat Pool bought the terminal and renamed it Saskatchewan Wheat Pool 11. The elevator was decommissioned in the late 1970s and is now owned by the Province of Ontario. The elevator remains standing on the banks of the Kam River.

Overview

Original Name:
Date of opening:
Designer:
Builder:
Initial Owner:
Current Owner:

Consolidated
4 June 1907
Barnett-McQueen James Stewert and Co.
Barnett-McQueen (tile) James Stewert and Co. (concrete)
Consolidated Elevator Company
Province of Ontario

Capacity:
Piles:
Initial Railway Service:
Geographic Service:
Operating:

1,750,000 bushels or 47,630 tonnes
--
Canadian Pacific
48.362860, -89.273154
No, decommissioned

CPR Elevator D Fort William_061

Saskatchewan Wheat Pool 17

Overview

Original Name:
Date of opening:
Designer:
Builder:
Initial Owner:
Current Owner:

CPR Elevator D
1897
F.J. Weber and Company
Steel Storage Company of Buffalo
CPR
--

Capacity:
Piles:
Initial Railway Service:
Geographic Service:
Operating:

7,750,000 bushels or 210,900 tonnes
11,000
Canadian Pacific
48.363974, -89.260707
No, demolished

Riverside Grain 17 P1010869_Riverside Ogilvie closeup IanD

Riverside Grains

Overview

Original Name:
Date of opening:
Designer:
Builder:
Initial Owner:
Current Owner:

Ogilvie
1905
--
J.A. Macdonald and Company
Olgilvie Flour Mills
Unknown

Capacity:
Piles:
Initial Railway Service:
Geographic Service:
Operating:

3,000,000 bushels - 81,600 tonnes
--
Canadian Pacific
48.3751230, -89.248021
No, decommissioned

Dwyer hhm

Gillepsie

Overview

Original Name:
Date of opening:
Designer:
Builder:
Initial Owner:
Current Owner:

Dwyer
1913
--
T.T. Ibberson
Dwyer Elevator Company
--

Capacity:
Piles:
Initial Railway Service:
Geographic Service:
Operating:

250,000 bushels - 6,800 tonnes
--
Canadian Pacific
48.375320, -89.244084
No, demolished

CPR Elevator B hhm

CPR B

Overview

Original Name:
Date of opening:
Designer:
Builder:
Initial Owner:
Current Owner:

CPR B
1889
CPR's W.J. Ross; Barnett-McQueen (reconstruction)
CPR's W.J. Ross; Barnett-McQueen (reconstruction)
CPR
--

Capacity:
Piles:
Initial Railway Service:
Geographic Service:
Operating:

500,000 bushels - 13,600 tonnes
--
Canadian Pacific
48.383694, -89.241181
No, demolished

CPR e

CPR E

Overview

Original Name:
Date of opening:
Designer:
Builder:
Initial Owner:
Current Owner:

CPR E
1903
Macdonald Engineering Company
CPR
CPR
--

Capacity:
Piles:
Initial Railway Service:
Geographic Service:
Operating:

2,500,000 bushels - 68,000 tonnes
--
Canadian Pacific
48.385443, -89.238842
No, demolished

CPR A

CPR A

Overview

Original Name:
Date of opening:
Designer:
Builder:
Initial Owner:
Current Owner:

CPR A
1884
CPR's W.J. Ross
CPR's D. Leary Brothers
CPR
--

Capacity:
Piles:
Initial Railway Service:
Geographic Service:
Operating:

2,300,000 bushels - 62,595 bushels
--
Canadian Pacific
48.396340, -89.237373
No, demolished

CPR Elevator C hhm

CPR C

Overview

Original Name:
Date of opening:
Designer:
Builder:
Initial Owner:
Current Owner:

CPR C
1891
J.A. Jamieson
J.A. Jamieson
CPR
--

Capacity:
Piles:
Initial Railway Service:
Geographic Service:
Operating:

1,250,000 bushels or 34,000 tonnes
--
Canadian Pacific
48.387174, -89.236182
No, demolished

empire

Saskatchewan Wheat Pool 12

Overview

Original Name:
Date of opening:
Designer:
Builder:
Initial Owner:
Current Owner:

Empire Elevator
1904
Barnett-McQueen
Barnett-McQueen
Empire Elevator Company Ltd.
--

Capacity:
Piles:
Initial Railway Service:
Geographic Service:
Operating:

1,750,000 bushels - 47,600 bushels
--
Canadian Pacific
48.394071, -89.215860
No, demolished

G3 Terminal

Constructed in 1928, the Searle Terminal Elevator, now known as G3, was constructed in 1928 on Mission River. Able to hold 3,000,000 bushels, it's construction contract was fulfilled by Fegles Construction Company at the cost of approximately $1,000,000. The elevator was advertised as being unique to previous elevators due to a difference in the design of the overall structure. The elevator featured fire-proof reinforced concrete, a car shed, a drier,
two stroage annexes, a wheat washer, office building, and a garage. The elevator's ambitious construction period allowed it to thrive without the need for additions, meaning the elevator's day-to-day operations went relatively unchanged until 1972 where Searle became Sasketchewan Pool #15 due to a change in ownership and again in 1991 where the elevator
ceased operation entirely. Eventually, the elevator was converted into a Fiber Fuel Products plant and later came under ownership of G3 where it currently serves as their Thunder Bay terminal.

Today, G3 currently operates at 200 Darrel Avenue and has a capacity of 137,740 tonnes. More information can be found at https://www.g3.ca/facility/g3-thunder-bay.

Overview

Original Name:
Date of opening:
Designer:
Builder:
Initial Owner:
Current Owner:

Searle
1928
C.D. Howe
Fegles Construction Company
Searle
G3

Capacity:
Piles:
Initial Railway Service:
Geographic Service:
Operating:

3,000,000 bushels (1928) - 137,740 tonnes (2019)
--
Canadian Pacific
48.35745486610609, -89.22910622321069
Yes

Superior

Currently open and operational at 140 Darrel Ave, Superior Terminal is one of the few elevators that has withstood the test of time and the changing of the grain trade. Part of a partnership between Cargill and Parrish and Heimbecker, Superior began operation in 1910 as the Grand Trunk Pacific elevator, an elevator that received notoriety due to a photograph of the building being used on a widely circulated European postcard (find photo, refer to) published by Valentine and Sons.

The elevator's sustainability can be contributed to the way it was built. When the elevator was being designed, architects made a point to construct an elevator that would support future additions. For example, at the beginning of its construction, the elevator's capacity during its starting years was 3,250,000 bushels, but the elevator was designed to support at least
60,000,000 bushels with future additions.

Overview

Original Name:
Date of opening:
Designer:
Builder:
Initial Owner:
Current Owner:

Grand Trunk Pacific
1910
R.H. Folwell
W.R Sinks, John S. Metclaf
Grand Trunk Pacific
Parrish and Heimbecker

Capacity:
Piles:
Initial Railway Service:
Geographic Service:
Operating:

3,250,000 bushels (original) - 176,020 tonnes (current)
--
Canadian Pacific
48.35495326646581, -89.23086985945702
Yes

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